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Yoga Bridge  is a 501(c)(3) non-profit that provides evidence-based coping strategies to complement medical treatment for cancer and recovery.  We offer free and low-cost yoga programs to all people affected by cancer.  Students are part of a nurturing community where they find relief from fatigue, muscle weakness, and stress.

Our Yoga Bridge class is featured in this video from CW33 last fall.  Click on the link to watch:
http://cw33.com/2014/10/23/yoga-bridge-connects-body-and-mind-for-cancer-survivors/

Learning in Action
Spring Class of 2015
 
 
 


From our BLOG:


Yoga Bridge is interviewed by Rob Schware, executive director of the Give Back Yoga Foundation on:


December 11, 2014
Read the article in Lewisville Leader:
Nonprofit Yoga Bridge Offers Free Cancer Yoga Classes in Denton County

Yoga Bridge is featured on News Channel CW33:  http://cw33.com/2014/10/23/yoga-bridge-connects-body-and-mind-for-cancer-survivors/




October 7, 2014


Pamela Ryan, leading the class in a Warrior II adaptation


Yoga class relieves cancer patients, survivors
By Linda Kessler, Intern Writer
Read more here.





My Yoga Story
by Guest Blogger, Patricia Tavis

     Serious practitioners of yoga generally have a story of “how they came to yoga.” They will speak of that moment almost reverently, an epiphany of the awakening of their mind, body, and spirit. I, too, have my “how I came to yoga” story.  That moment was borne out of a dark place in my life. 

     It was a time I felt helpless, hopeless, and out of control.  Years of caring for a son with autism and a daughter with learning and mental health challenges had taken a toll.  I also was the mother of a “typical” son I worried I was neglecting because of the time my special needs children required. 
     My days were filled with tantrums and meltdowns, doctors and therapists, and medication management.  There were school meetings and conferences and planned activities for social interaction, so important for children with special needs. 
     In addition, there were the ordinary tasks of living:  cooking, cleaning, laundry, shopping, paying bills and other countless tasks we do every day.  I was married, but my husband was busy with the demands of his job.  I felt isolated and alone.  I felt angry that I had been dealt this unfair hand.  This was not the motherhood I had envisioned.  I suffered from anxiety and panic attacks and had severe eczema on my hands.  I joined a parent support group in an attempt to find others who understood my struggle. 
     One day a yoga teacher came to our meeting to give a demonstration class.  Stress relief is a well-known benefit of yoga, and as special needs parents, we certainly needed it!  She gave a 30-minute class of basic breathing techniques and simple yoga poses.  I had taken some yoga classes before,  but it never held my interest for long.  Something was different that day; I was different.  Suddenly, I felt less anxious and more calm.  I knew then yoga needed to be a part of my life. 
     Looking back, I know with certainty that brief class was my “moment”. It was how I “came to yoga.” As soon as I got home, I ordered a yoga DVD from the internet.  Fortunately, it was one by a wonderful teacher, Sara Ivanhoe, who has a gift for explaining yoga poses clearly and simply. 
     For the first time, yoga made sense!  I practiced hours a day and took classes at a local yoga studio.  I became enthralled with this beautiful practice.  As I gained mastery over my body and my breath, I gained mastery over my mind and the chaos that had ruled it.  I felt myself slowly but surely backing away from that dark abyss of despair that was always threatening to engulf me.  My panic attacks stopped, and my eczema began to heal.  I found more moments of enjoyment with my children.
     A year later, at the age of 52, I entered a yoga teacher training program.  Physically and mentally, it was one of the hardest journeys I had ever undertaken.  I came home many nights in tears from sheer exhaustion.  I refused to give into my doubts and clung to my yoga mat with a fierce determination that yoga was my path to healing and wholeness. 
The day I graduated from my yoga teacher training program (such a happy day!) 

     I graduated in June, 2009, and have been teaching yoga ever since.  It was one of the best decisions I ever made, and I feel so privileged that I am able to share my love of yoga with my students.  I feel especially fortunate that at the age of 52 I was able to forge a new career that I truly have a passion for.
     Life can take us to places we did not want to go and give us challenges we did not expect to face.  Sometimes we can get lost for a while in the dark alleys of our soul.  I am fortunate that I found yoga to lead me out of that dark place.  Even now, sometimes I feel overwhelmed by the demands on me.  It is at those times I head to my mat and my practice, knowing whatever is going on in my life, yoga will be there for me.  Namaste.
With my children
About the author:  I am a 200-hour certified yoga teacher. Gentle and chair yoga are my favorite types of yoga to teach. My goal as a teacher is to make yoga accessible to everyone.  I also enjoy volunteering my time to teach those with special needs. I enjoy spending time with my family, especially at the beautiful Jersey shore.   Favorite quote:  "Awaken the victor in yourself, arouse the sleeping hero in yourself, and lo! no sorrow will ever again overwhelm you." Paramahansa Yogananda


Desk Yoga Tips from Yoga Bridge
By Susan Reeves

September 2, 2014


Yoga Bridge has been asked to speak at the next Healthy U event, sponsored by the Medical Center at Lewisville on September 11.  Here are some of the poses that we'll be sharing with the crowd.




Standing Cat/Cow  Stand behind chair with feet hip distance apart.  Place hands on back of the chair.  Take a few breaths through the nose, standing tall.  Inhaling, lift the chest.  Exhale, round through the mid and upper back, tuck the chin, tuck the tailbone.  Inhale, lengthen the spine, reach forward through the chest, look forward.  Repeat several times.  Releases tension.

Standing Twist Flow – Feet hip distance , knees softly bent.  Begin slow twisting movement.  Arms flow into the twist, tapping the body as they land.  Can speed up.  Head can follow the movement of the twist. 1-2 min.  Releases stagnation, energizing.

Standing Camel -  Feet hip distance apart.  Reach arms out, shoulder-height, thumbs face down, palms reach behind, press arms back.  Option to place fists at sacrum (low down the back).  Press the hips forward very slightly as you lift your chest open and up.  Reach your elbows back and towards each other.  15-30 seconds.  Can repeat.  Energizing, mood boosting.

Strong Goddess Stance – Step feet apart wider than hips, toes pointing out at angle.  Keeping the spine vertical, knees bent, begin to bend the knees out to the side.  Arms reach out to the sides, shoulder-height.  Bend elbows, hands up.  Hold this stance for several breaths. Release.  Repeat if desired.  Energizing, strengthening.

Standing Forward Fold - Stand behind chair with feet hip distance, hands on the back of the chair.  Walk  feet back and relax head between arms.  Can also do this with elbows on the back of the chair.  Hold for several breaths.  Rise.  Soothing, calming.

~Yoga Bridge™  is a 501(c)(3) non-profit that offers free and low-cost yoga programs to all people affected by cancer.  Students are part of a nurturing community where they find relief from fatigue, muscle weakness, and stress.     www.yogabridge.org  Lewisville, Flower Mound, Denton


 
Yoga Bridge Teacher, BJ Neubauer, has her article, The Unassuming Beauty of Yoga, featured on Communities Foundation of Texas web-site. Click the link below to read.

Yoga Bridge is one of the recipients for their North Texas Giving Day event, occurring on September 18.

Typical Yoga for Cancer Class at Yoga Bridge
By BJ Neubauer

July 22, 2014

BJ Neubauer

[BJ is a 500-RYT yoga teacher and grad of our Yoga for Cancer training.  These are her observations from one of our recent classes.]

Arrival.  As the students arrive for class, the teacher is very welcoming and warm. Lots of eye contact, checking in with current patient updates, treatment, pain, etc. Lots of first names. Plenty of joking & smiling.


Teacher assists during a restorative pose.

Meditation/Pranayama.  A guided meditation facilitates breath coordination.  Very warm & reassuring teaching. Sound is introduced as a healing tool.  Guidance into body awareness, noticing the upper back lifting & strengthening. Lots of breath awareness – watching the breath travel to different body parts, different areas.

Movement.  10 minutes into class the students are invited to set intention.
20 minutes into class music starts as students begin to add movement. Gentle rocking and swaying.  The class progresses easily into a side to side flow with stacked arms.  Because the teacher knows the students well, she offers lots of hands on assistance and guidance.
Restorative/Savasana. The class is led into a supported heart opener. As the students settle back with eyes closed, this posture brings immediate smiles to faces. The students are unaware and not consciously directing their smiles; it was a natural response to the posture.  Amazing experience to be part of that.  The class progresses and is led into a natural and lengthy savasana. No one seems hurried. All have had a chance to experience success in ANY form of an asana available to them.

Restorative heart-opening pose.

From BJ:   The other thing I loved about observing was how much more in tune I became with the student experience. I thought I would go to class to learn more modifications, sequencing and adjustment techniques (which I did experience) but what I really got from this exercise was the opportunity to see the profound effects on the students. Starting with a synchronized breath exercise, progressing into a little more movement, a little more talk and interactive participation from teacher AND students…the entire class visibly softened and moved as a cohesive unit.



Cindy Atherton Epp Reviews the Book
Adapt Ability: How to Survive Change You Didn't Ask For by MJ RyanJuly 16, 2014


Cindy with Yoga Bridge class

I chose this book because of the title.  It reminded me of several people that I know who have had cancer.  It seemed as if their world came to a screeching halt...everything changed. 
Is it the truth? MJ Ryan writes a section on the "Seven Truths About Change." That truly could have been all that was written and this would have been a wonderful book.  Each "truth" challenged my belief system at different levels. They are (1) It is inevitable; (2) it is not personal; (3) thinking too much can be detrimental; (4) fear, not change, is the enemy; (5) it has a predictable emotional cycle; (6) you are more resilient than you think; and (7) your future is built on bedrock that is unchanging.  Each section discusses the lies we believe and where they may have originated.
Empowerment.  Ryan challenges the reader to be a "change master", someone she describes as being able to recognize stress, and to know the steps for handling change in a quick and positive way.  She gives practical ways to adapt to change, starting with accepting that something unexpected has come into your life and that you will have to make a change. She helps the reader to understand how the brain works in our benefit for the most part.   However, when our circumstances change, the wiring in the brain still wants to work in its usual way.

Reframing the situation. She encourages one to assess the situation at hand, and jump in with both feet to take action, thus creating new "wiring" and growth. Her encouragement helps the reader to look at change as more of a challenge than an obstacle that cannot be overcome. She also speaks to the situations where one may need to ask for help from others and find peace with just "making it". 

Learning from the past.  The last section of her book is about strengthening your adaptability. Ryan encourages the reader to take notice of lessons learned through changing circumstances and to draw on those lessons for the next time change happens.  The book also includes self-help questionnaires and charts to help the reader personally discover their own beliefs and then create strategies and plans.
I enjoyed the book for my own personal benefit and to some level as a Yoga for Cancer instructor. I think it would be helpful for cancer patients to read as well.  I listened to it twice on CD in my travels to Oklahoma.

Fellow Yoga Bridge teacher,
Debbie Simon, with Cindy
at Relay for Life

***Cindy Atherton Epp, RYT-200, is a yoga teacher in Denton.  She recently completed her advanced training in Yoga for Cancer with Yoga Bridge.
 

Yoga Bridge is in the local news:
http://starlocalmedia.com/lewisvilleleader/news/medical-center-of-lewisville-expands-oncology-services/article_a5a744f0-021d-11e4-aa3a-0019bb2963f4.html


Yoga Bridge writes about our students' experiences in our Yoga for Cancer programs in Yoga Digest
"Yoga can make a difference in the life of someone facing a cancer diagnosis. Clinical trials are proving it, and the students in a Yoga for Cancer class in Denton, Texas are evidence of it as well."
Read more here.
Yoga Bridge Students at our Holiday Party, 2013

True Refuge by Tara Brach- A review by Debbie Simon
May 19, 2014

Student at Relay for Life in Denton

Meditation and trauma. I picked up this book a couple of weeks before the Yoga for Cancer training because I was looking for a resource on how meditation could help people deal with traumatic events in life.  Since the shootings in Newtown, Connecticut I have wondered how people are able to cope when devastating things happen in their lives. True Refuge gives its readers three gateways into ways to find peace in life in any circumstance.

A refuge. Most of us will never deal with something as heartbreaking as the Newtown shootings, but we do have to deal with insecurity, fear, anxiety, worry, fatigue and a multitude of other human frailties and suffering.  We also have to witness these things happen to those we love and people around the world.   The refuges for dealing with life that Tara offers are: truth, love and awareness.  The author goes on to explain how meditation, specifically mindfulness meditation, gives us space to look at our lives through these gateways.  She gives heart wrenching and humorous stories on how our thoughts can be our own worst enemy.  There are personal stories about her own struggles with her health, divorce, insecurities and anxieties as well as real life stories of others who are dealing with their own struggles of abuse, prejudice, cancer and death of a spouse.


Yoga for Cancer Class in Denton
The body as teacher. The key is to step back and recognize thoughts, allow them to be, investigate them with kindness and then practice non-attachment to them.  Often our bodies are the first sign that we are feeling something.  The book teaches how to listen to our bodies, notice if our heart is beating quickly or if it feels squeezed, if our stomach is tied in knots, our shoulders are all the way up in our ears. 

What is our body trying to tell us?  This has applications for the Yoga for Cancer class - teaching the students to stay in touch with their body even if they feel betrayed by it; to stay in touch with their feelings without running away, suppressing, or instantly acting on them.  This gives a person space to breathe and respond appropriately.  There are several meditations included in the book: breath, mindfulness, Metta (loving-kindness) and self-inquiry.  These practices are critical for mental health and wellbeing for everyone. 

Helping others.  After taking the Yoga for Cancer training, I realized how important this book will be in my teaching of this population.  It will help me understand the complexities of human emotions, thoughts and behavior.  Though this book is based on Buddhist teachings, it is very practical and useful for anyone who wants to learn how to deal with the complexities of the human condition in their own lives and in the lives of others.


Debbie Simon, RYT-500, is a yoga teacher in Flower Mound and Lewisville.  She has been teaching for 7 years and recently completed her advanced training in Yoga for Cancer with Yoga Bridge
.  Debbie was instrumental in the creation of a new Yoga for Cancer class at The Medical Center of Lewisville, beginning May 28.   From Debbie:  "As I’ve gotten older, I’ve found my practice and teaching has moved towards the gentler more compassionate way.  Since everything is always changing, Yoga is a way for me to connect with the one thing that is unchanging: the stillness within.  I hope to bring a sense of peace and calm through gentle movements, meditation and breathwork that will help access that unchanging aspect within all of us."

A Review of Dr. Timothy Mcall's Yoga as Medicine
By Lesslie York

May 12, 2014


The book.  Yoga as Medicine is a book of yoga therapy by Dr. Timothy McCall, a Western trained physician and a practicing yogi. Dr. McCall explains what yoga is, what yoga does and   who can benefit. McCall believes yoga is the most powerful system of overall health and well-being he has ever seen.

Lesslie leads a Yoga for Cancer class in Denton

How yoga helps. The benefits of yoga for a healthy person or a person struggling with an illness are endless:  increases flexibility, strengthens muscles, improves balance, improves immune function, improves lung function and increases circulation of lymph, just to name a few.  In each chapter scientific evidence is stated proving how yoga helped the patient feel better and suppress negative side effects of the disease or its treatment.

Yoga and cancer.  In chapter 12 cancer is explained. Jnani Chapman, a registered nurse and yoga teacher whose yoga therapy is based on the Integral yoga of Swami Satchidananda.  Jnani's student is a 39 year old breast cancer patient who had a lumpectomy and is going through chemotherapy, radiation and taking the drug tamoxifen The patient had never done yoga but started during her second round of chemotherapy. 


The class.  Jnani uses gentle poses done sitting in a chair or on a mat on the floor. She uses a tuning in exercise in the beginning of practice and meditation at the end of practice. Jnani likes slow, regular and mindful movements to reduce tension. To keep fatigue at bay she uses a "exert, rest, exert, rest" pattern for the asanas.  
After the tuning in exercise, Jnani's student sits in a chair and begins the vertical head movement then does the horizontal head movement. Next comes head tilting and shoulder shrugs. The 6th exercise is full circular rotation of the shoulders. The last three exercises are extended exhalation breath, meditation and yoga nidra. 

Student practices yoga using a chair at Yoga Bridge in Flower Mound, TX

Yoga and lymphedema.  Lymphedema is a common side effect of treatment for breast cancer especially if lymph nodes under the arm are removed. Jnani advices when doing cat/table to keep the affected side elevated to prevent swelling. Jnani does not teach breath retention because patients need oxygen to move  lymph and improve immune function.


Results.  Jnani's student thinks her yoga practice helped her go through chemo with little side effects. She never had nausea which is very common during treatment. The body awareness she gained with yoga helps her relax certain muscles and she is always mindful of her breath.

***Lesslie York is a yoga teacher in Dallas.  She recently completed her advanced training in Yoga for Cancer with Yoga Bridge.

Mary Dunklin Reviews the Book
Cancer Fitness: Exercise Programs for Cancer Patients and Survivors
Author: Anna L. Schwartz, FNP, Ph.D., FAAN

May 12, 2014

The book.  Cancer Fitness: Exercise Programs for Cancer Patients and Survivors offers scientific insights on the role exercise plays before, during and after cancer treatment. It is a  practical guide for all levels from non-exercisers all the way to serious athletes. (Lance Armstrong even provided a foreword praising the book.)

The author.  Ms. Schwartz has impressive credentials that make her a natural for writing this book. She was an oncology nurse who was diagnosed with non Hodgkin’s lymphoma at age 24 while she was in nursing school. She also has a bachelor’s in exercise science and returned to graduate school “to pursue a degree that would give me the skills to become a researcher and conduct the studies necessary to investigate and, I hoped, confirm the link between exercise and cancer recovery.”  The biggest way she dealt with juggling the personal and professional stress of cancer was exercise.  "
Exercise can’t make your cancer go away, but it certainly can help you look and feel better and have a better perspective and outlook on life,” she writes.

Yoga Bridge leading a class at Relay for Life in Denton, TX

Some reminders. She includes disclaimers throughout the book to check with your physician and that her exercise advice isn’t one-size-fits all. She also encourages setting limits and ways to stay safe and progress slowly. That’s what you’d expect her to say. What you wouldn’t expect is her strong stance that doctor’s advice to “just rest” isn’t always the best for most people. She goes on to detail how even 10 minutes of moderate exercise helps to battle fatigue, weight gain, and reduce bone loss caused by the effects of cancer medications.

Exercise helps fatigue.  Ms. Schwartz knows her audience and knows what roadblocks stand in the way of cancer patients and exercise. The biggest hurdle? Fatigue.“Fatigue is the number one side effect of cancer and its treatment,” she writes. “It is the most pervasive and disruptive side effect of cancer treatment and affects nearly 100 percent of patients.”   Her personal struggles  helped her find motivational ways for others to stick with exercise including goal-setting and breaking exercise into 2-minute segments throughout the day until endurance increases.


Scientific evidence and personal experience.  The book includes case studies of how exercise helped to alleviate depression, sleep problems and weight gain in people of various ages with various types of cancer. Patients in research studies provide consistent evidence that exercise is an important and – all too often – forgotten part of the treatment plan. These first-hand accounts offer a window into how other “real” people added exercises into their treatment plans. “Many of my patients find that exercise before chemotherapy, even their first course of chemotherapy, helps them to feel less anxious and more relaxed,” she writes. “Exercise not only reduces the anxiety and apprehension before treatment, it also gets your blood circulating, which makes it easier for the nurse to insert an intravenous catheter to draw blood or infuse chemotherapy. " 


The exercises.  She includes several suggested exercises focusing on core strength and weightlifting using dumbbells and exercise bands. The photos of each exercise and detailed instructions make it easy to follow even for beginners. Sections on relaxation, breathing and visualization offer more tools for the reader to incorporate into their overall well-being.  Although this book is aimed at patients, it’s a helpful read for caregivers – including yoga teachers – to understand the role exercise plays and to encourage it for the overall health and well-being of patients throughout the cancer journey.

***Mary Dunklin is a yoga teacher, registered with Yoga Alliance at the 200-hour level, and a Yoga Bridge Yoga for Cancer Teacher.  She brings her playful, nurturing attitude to every class she leads and is comfortable teaching to all ages and abilities.  Mary encourages functional fitness in her classes and helps students discover balance, strength and grace.






Yoga Bridge at Denton Relay for Life
April, 2014

Kristina Shiroma Reviews the Book
Relax and Renew: Restful Yoga for
Stressful Times by Judith Lasater

3/14/2014




Yoga Bridge Yoga for Cancer Class
Restorative Yoga.  Judith Lasater explains rest and relaxation as different from sleep.  Sleep includes active brain, physiological tension (dreams, twitches).  Rest is letting the brain go quiet, and remaining physiologically still. Further, Lasater maintains: how to move into a pose is just as important as being in the pose.  This speaks to the ultimate sense of calm that needs to be presented and maintained [in a restorative yoga class].  Cueing to keep eyes closed, move slowly, take time, no rushing, are just as important as creating a calm, restful environment.


Pranayama.  Some of Lasater’s quotes resonated with me and changed my outlook/approach to teaching pranayama [breathing techniques]. Lasater states “Success is not measured by how much air, in or out." It is important not to strain or force; this strain can actually trigger panic.  The idea of using your breath to change your response to a situation is something that could provide a takeaway for students.  Lasater teaches, “awareness of the breath brings awareness of the moment.” Using this, the teacher can suggest/cue during pranayama: “As you inhale, think “in the moment, I feel/am/experience” exhale “finish/create your own statement.” 

Be in the Moment.  Restorative is about “being” more than doing.  This idea connects back to the breath and breathing, to be present in the moment.  My job [as a yoga teacher] is to create a sacred time for patients/caregivers to get away, breathe, and simply be.  I must be aware that this may be the only hour of true relaxation they experience. 

Menopause.  Prior to the Yoga Bridge Yoga for Cancer training, I would have skimmed over the Menopause chapter.  Now, I have learned that a lot patients enter into cancer treatment in their later menopausal years.  Also, younger women may be forced to enter menopause early as a result of surgery/treatments.  The idea of the changing roles that women take on emotionally, mentally, and symbolically,  struck a chord with me.  Not only are these women facing the change of life, but also the changes in everyday life after the diagnosis of cancer.  Patients are smack dab in the middle of this emotional and physical turmoil when we are teaching them. I think about this a lot. This time isn’t about fixing.  This time is about being. This time is about an hour escape that they can take with them and access whenever they choose. 


www.yogabridge.org
Yoga for Cancer Teachers at Yoga Bridge Holiday Potluck
Together.  We are never done learning, being, fighting.  We have work to do, let’s do it together.  Just as we yoke body and breath, we can yoke to each other to do work, which reflects camaraderie in the room.   “Come into harmony with body’s natural rhythm,” advises Lasater.









***Kristina Shiroma is a yoga teacher, registered with Yoga Alliance at the 200-hour level, and a Yoga Bridge Yoga for Cancer Teacher.  She believes, while she can provide the knowledge to practice yoga safely and effectively, the individual's body and breath is the true teacher. Yoga can be manifested by anyone.  As long as you are breathing, you have the capacity to do yoga.

Lerna Clearman Reviews the Book
HOW YOGA WORKS
By Geshe Michael Roach and Christie McNally
2/8/14

This book is a fictional account of how Patanjali’s yoga sutras reached Tibet from India. The book’s plot is an intriguing tale of how a young girl traveling alone in India is detained by police in a border town because a book is found in her possession. 

A female traveling alone is unheard of; a book is considered to be a rare treasure,  and therefore is assumed to be stolen.  When the girl not only claims the book was given to her by her teacher, but that she can read the book, the police place her in jail until the truth is sorted out.

The girl is interrogated and, to prove she can read and knows the contents of the book, she explains “just a little” to the police captain who is suffering from severe back problems.  The girl offers to work with the captain to alleviate his back pain, and so begins the practice of yoga. 



The girl is in police custody for a year and, during her detention, she introduces the sutras from her book as they are needed to gain the trust of those imprisoning her and to demonstrate how to heal one’s body and heart.

Among the topics that have deep impact on the storyline are:
• Introducing poses in response to physical discomfort, then establishing a disciplined practice
• Understanding compassion by teaching others also in pain
• Understanding how breath “out of rhythm” affects pain in the body and a mind that flies with unhappy thoughts   
• Learning meditation as silent sitting
• Perceiving what is and what seems to be and how our minds turn things around
• Concept of grasping
• Learning to withdraw the mind from  physical senses
• Clutter and cleanliness
• Seeds of the mind—both good and bad seeds and the connection of cause and effect
• Truthfulness
• Non-harming
• Self-control
• Possessiveness
• Time and space
• World view


Not all of the sutras are mentioned; of those that are, some are not in the sequence that Patanjali  wrote, but are cleverly interwoven into the interesting plot.  Many of the sutras are introduced conversationally at one point and then revisited as circumstances in the storyline allow practical application or in depth discussion.

The plot of the book is interesting enough to draw in not only someone well-versed in the yoga sutras, but the beginner yoga student as well, and is a great way for such students to see the practical application of the sutras.


***Lerna Clearman is a yoga teacher, registered with Yoga Alliance at the 500-hour level, and a Yoga Bridge Yoga for Cancer Teacher.  She teaches Gentle Yoga, Vinyasa Flow, and Restorative in Kaufmann, Texas. 

From her web-site:  "I began practicing yoga in my mid 50s when my body seemed to be responding less to vigorous exercise, less willing to do what I wanted it to do. I began simply because it was less intense and seemed easier on my joints. What I found was through the wonderful stretching and the focus on breathing that my body was willing to do more and more, bringing greater flexibility than I had ever experienced. But for me the real joy of yoga are the calming elements. With the practice of yoga, one learns to truly appreciate your body and develop a sense of being ageless."


 

Yoga Bridge at Denton Relay for Life:
April 20, 2013

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Yoga as Medicine, a Review by Pamela Ryan
Saturday, April 27, 2013

In a recent online summit, Dr. Baxter Bell gave a lecture titled “Yoga as Medicine.” The lecture centered on the mounting empirical evidence that yoga is proven to have a beneficial effect on stress management.  In his presentation, Dr. Bell listed just a few of the ways in which stress negatively affects our health:

·        Decreased bone density
·        Fatigue
·        Weight gain/increased appetite
·        Impaired immune system function
·        Problems with memory
·        Increase in blood sugar
·        Increase in blood pressure
·        Increased cholesterol levels

One would have to be living under a rock not to know that regular exercise is a foundation of good health.  But yoga is unique in that it addresses not only muscular strength, but it aims to balance one’s strength and flexibility. And it is designed to accommodate anyone of any fitness level.


Even more important, I believe, is the calming effect of breathing exercises and meditation. Training the brain to deepen awareness and quality of thoughts automatically leads to impulse control and a more thoughtful/less reactive disposition.

Consistency is paramount. We have to do the practice in order to receive the benefits. Many people feel that they cannot add one more thing to their already overloaded schedule, but the raw truth is: it is monumentally more expensive and time consuming to be sick.  Namaste.

Pamela is a yoga teacher, massage therapist, and co-founder of Yoga Bridge™.


Current Research Results: Improved quality of life, general health, and physical function in breast cancer patients who practice yoga regularly  By Susan Reeves

Yoga Bridge offers free Yoga for Cancer classes and privates for those currently in treatment. This is the third in a series of articles I’ve written about yoga and cancer research at MD Anderson. Click on this link to read the first two articles: http://yogabridgecancersupport.blogspot.com/p/articles.html

Clinical research is beginning to show promising proof that a practicing yoga can have beneficial effects for those going through cancer treatment and for survivors of cancer. In a lecture about this topic, Dr. Lorenzo Cohen, PhD, Director of Integrative Medicine Program at MD Anderson, shared some of his research findings. In a collaborative study with the Vyasa Group, Dr. Cohen worked with women who were in radiation treatment for breast cancer. According to him, these women were “a great group to work with”, because they tend to be at the hospital a lot for their treatments…"they’re here and they’re captive.”
  

Dr. Lorenzo Cohen
Photo courtesy of MD Anderson web-site

In this particular study, the patients attended yoga sessions twice a week for six weeks. The practice consisted of pranayama (breathing techniques), 7 simple asana (yoga posture) movements that included forward bends, back-bending, and side-bending, deep relaxation, and meditation.

The results:

1) General health improved
 2) Physical function improved
 3) Fatigue levels improved
 4) Post-chemo induced nausea frequency, intensity improved
 5) Intensity of anticipatory nausea, anticipatory vomiting improved
 6) Ability to find meaning in their cancer experience improved
 7) Cortisol levels improved
 8) Reduction of intrusive thoughts stayed the same

Dr. Cohen explained that the reason the patients were seeing such results from this study was that they were showing up for all of the yoga sessions, they were DO-ing the yoga, a “captive” audience, as he mentioned.

Something worth noting was the lack of change in intrusive thoughts. Dr. Cohen believes that time will tell with this one. He acknowledges that sitting still and meditating could be quite challenging in the midst of cancer treatment, but believes that ultimately a meditative practice would be therapeutic for these patients in the long run. He intends to devote future, more expansive, research toward looking into the specific effects of meditation.

Of all the results from this research, Dr. Cohen believes a big predictor of yoga’s effectiveness lies in the results of the cortisol levels. Cortisol, a stress hormone that is high in the a.m. and tends to drop at night, was definitely affected in a beneficial way as a result of the yoga practice.



The key, according to Dr. Cohen, is regular class attendance. Quoting him from this lecture, “You have to have a daily practice, [preferably] at least 5 days a week.

Other ongoing studies from additional researchers include:

“Yoga with multi-ethnic Breast CancerPatients and Quality of Life” (Study being conducted in New York)

“Yoga for persistent fatigue in braincancer survivors” (an Iyengar yoga-based practice is the subject in this one from UCLA)

More about Dr. Cohen

From his bio on the MD Anderson web-site: "Dr. Cohen is currently conducting a number of NIH-funded randomized controlled clinical trials examining the biobehavioral effects of contemplative mind-body practices aimed at reducing the negative aspects of cancer treatment and improving quality of life including studies of meditation, Tibetan yoga, Patanjali-based yoga, Tai chi/Qigong, and other behavioral strategies such as stress management, emotional writing, and neurofeedback. He is principal investigator of a newly funded phase III clinical trial of yoga for women with breast cancer with colleagues from Bangalore, India. Dr. Cohen is also conducting research to demonstrate that lifestyle changes can influence cancer outcomes."

Susan is a yoga teacher and co-founder of Yoga Bridge™.


Inspiration
Thursday, February 21, 2013


In need of a little inspiration? Click on the link to watch this video of teacher, Pamela Ryan's sister's daughter-in-law.
http://www.firstcoastnews.com/video/default.aspx?bctid=2158145732001&odyssey=mod%7cnewswell%7ctext%7cFRONTPAGE%7cfeatured


Some Light Reading
Thursday, January 10, 2013

Some reading recommendations from one of our students, Barbara Graham:

I'd like to pass along the name/author of a cookbook that I've been using. It's called Clean Food by Terry Walters (her web site is great, too - www.terrywalters.net). I think I like it so much because she makes you feel like you can easily incorporate the recipes into your lifestyle whether you are a vegetarian, need a gluten free diet, or simply want to add more plant-based foods into your regular diet. Plus, so far, everything I've tried has been delicious! Terry makes the whole process of eating healthier seem less intimidating, and many of the recipes are fairly simple.

Since cooking from her book, I find myself going back to the other cookbook I bought in 2011, The Cancer-Fighting Kitchen by Rebecca Katz. This book is good, as well, especially for people going through treatment. She uses many of the same ingredients as Terry, but Terry has a section which thoroughly explains many of the ingredients that are not commonly used. Now that I have a better understanding, I'm trying more of the recipes in Rebecca Katz's book.

We Love Bradie!
Thursday, January 10, 2013

We at Yoga Bridge™ appreciate the support of NFL player, Bradie James.  His Foundation 56 helps to fund part of our program.










http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CTCoJic2ed8&feature=player_embedded



Wellness Fair at Mark Cuban Center in Oak Cliff   By Susan Reeves
Sunday, October 28, 2012


Shanna, leading the opening meditation.



Yoga Bridge™ was invited to lead the yoga portion at Bradie James' Health And Wellness Fair on Saturday at the Mark Cuban Center in Oak Cliff. The event was hosted to celebrate breast cancer awareness month. Boot camp, zumba, yoga, and games for the kids were offered.

Shanna Nasche and I were excited to lead the yoga session, and a bit stunned when a couple of the Mav ManiAACs from the Dallas Mavericks Basketball team came in to crash the class, and stayed for the entire time!



Mavs Maniacs always add an element of crazy.



The best moment of the day came when several of the students, who admitted that they had never considered practicing yoga, stopped us after class to tell us how much they now love yoga. They asked if we could come teach yoga there all the time. If only it weren't so far away! We loved it!



Shanna and Susan



Labels: Bradie James, Breast cancer yoga, cancer yoga, dallas mavericks, Foundation 56, october cancer awareness month, Yoga Bridge

Location: Oak Cliff, Dallas, TX, USA




Yoga Warriors Winning against Breast Cancer By Shanna Nasche 
Sunday, October 14, 2012


I’m grateful for the opportunities I’ve had to assist this group of yogini warriors who are in the midst of winning against breast cancer.
Photo courtesy of Love More Fear Less

The term “warriors” sounds a little one-dimensional but it includes
•smiles and acceptance from one face to another
•encouragement and hugs before, during and after the yoga
•total absorption in the moment
•willingness to keep showing up on the mat..
•courage to gently challenge painful or tight tissue and scars
•wisdom to know the difference between effort and ease
•determination to make individual progress.
The atmosphere is nurturing for all and the hour goes by so fast. I left with a song in my heart and my heart on my sleeve.

Maybe another way to sum up the energy I feel in this group and the women who attend is a quote from Eleanor Roosevelt: “A woman is like a tea bag; you never know how strong it is until it's in hot water.”
I look forward to another opportunity to meet these women warriors on the mat.

***Shanna Nasche, LPC, RYT-200 was a guest teacher in the Yoga for Cancer Class at Denton Regional in June. Yoga Bridge is a non-profit organization that addresses the needs of people in any stage of cancer diagnosis/ recovery through the healing practice of yoga in a supportive and nurturing environment. Yoga Bridge offers regular yoga classes, FREE yoga for cancer classes, workshops and teacher trainings.

Labels: alternative cancer treatments, Breast cancer yoga, Cancer Survivors, cancer yoga, denton country yoga cancer, shanna nasche, yoga and cancer research, yoga for cancer


Current  Research on Effects of Yoga with Cancer Patients
By Susan Reeves  
Sunday, September 30, 2013

In July of this year, I attended an oncology conference for yoga teachers at MD Anderson in Houston. I've written a little about it here. I’m writing now to include some more information I learned about the current research on yoga and cancer from Lorenzo Cohen, PhD, Director of Integrative Medicine Program at MD Anderson.

Dr. Cohen has led many clinical trials on this particular subject. This is so important because it helps to bridge the gap between Eastern health practices and Western medicine. Dr. Cohen’s findings are monumental.

More about Dr. Cohen

From his bio on the MD Anderson web-site: "Dr. Cohen is currently conducting a number of NIH-funded randomized controlled clinical trials examining the biobehavioral effects of contemplative mind-body practices aimed at reducing the negative aspects of cancer treatment and improving quality of life including studies of meditation, Tibetan yoga, Patanjali-based yoga, Tai chi/Qigong, and other behavioral strategies such as stress management, emotional writing, and neurofeedback. He is principal investigator of a newly funded phase III clinical trial of yoga for women with breast cancer with colleagues from Bangalore, India. Dr. Cohen is also conducting research to demonstrate that lifestyle changes can influence cancer outcomes."
The lecture

Dr. Cohen spoke at first about the lack of formal research on yoga and cancer. He expressed gratitude for a recent $4.5 million grant to MD Anderson to further his studies. Here are two of the major benefits he is discovering as a result.
Improvement in sleep disturbance. According to Dr. Cohen, 70% or more of cancer patients have trouble sleeping. The results of one of his studies (Randomized trials of effects of Tibetan Yoga Intervention in patients with lymphoma) proved hopeful. The cancer patients in the yoga control group slept better and needed less sleep medications.

Lessening of intrusive thoughts. In one of his studies with breast cancer patients, it was noticed that the women experienced less intrusive thoughts as a result of a regular yoga practice. He says, “Yoga is great as a buffer to cancer symptoms.”

There are many more positive findings from Dr. Cohen's studies. In my next blogpost, I’ll write more about his lecture where he talks about improved quality of life, general health, and physical function in breast cancer patients from his clinical studies.

I’ll leave you with a quote from his lecture: “ Yoga is the most accepted practice to enter medical sites because it is so non-intrusive.” I’m so thankful for all the research that he is doing. I’m thankful that I’m a yoga teacher, and I’m hopeful that I can bring the healing effects of yoga to the people who so very much need it.

Labels: alternative cancer treatments, Breast cancer yoga, clinical trials yoga and cancer, lorenzo cohen, md anderson yoga, nih trials, randomized trials on yoga and cancer, sleep and cancer, sleep and chemo


Yoga, Cancer, and MD Anderson
By Susan Reeves  
Sunday, August 5, 2012

I am a yoga teacher. Many of my students have cancer and are survivors of cancer.
Last month I attended an ocology training at MD Anderson in Houston. I'm not a doctor, and this wasn't an actual medical conference. It was the 4th Annual Oncology Training for Yoga Teachers. 


The major presenters are some of the giants in the research of the benefits of yoga asana, pranayama and meditation for patients undergoing treatment for cancer. Alejandro Chaoul, PhD, Lorenzo Cohen, PhD, and Dr. Richard T. Lee, MD are among several doctors and scientists in the Integrative Medicine arena who have been involved in recent clinical studies about yoga and cancer.

Their findings have been published in medical journals and within the yoga community around the world. Here is a summary of what they are discovering based upon their current research:
1) Chronic stress shortens the telomeres in cells and causes aging, leaving the cells susceptible to a host of conditions and diseases, especially cancer.
2) MBSR (Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction) techniques, such as yoga asana, breathwork, and meditation, help mood, depression, anger, sleep quality, and fatigue.
3) Secondary Lymphedema (a result of the removal of lymph nodes during surgery) can be relieved through movement, isometric exercises, and breathwork - [the major components of a yoga practice, my observation].

I'll be expanding on these studies in future writings, along with other topics including guidelines for safety, communication with medical staff, laughter yoga, teacher ethics, yoga postures and breathing techniques, meditation techniques, and the Indian model for cancer care.  For now, I'll leave you  with these quotes from two of the presenters:
Dr. Lorenzo Cohen, PhD, Professor and Program Director of the Integrative Medicine Program at MD Anderson: "Cancer patients need yoga more than any person on this planet."
Dr. Ki Shin, MD, Associate Professor of Rehabilitation Medicine at Baylor College of Medicine, says "We'll all be doing yoga in the future".

***Susan is a co-founder of Yoga Bridge™. Yoga Bridge™ addresses the needs of people in any stage of cancer diagnosis/ recovery through the healing practice of yoga in a supportive and nurturing environment. This program is provided through the generosity of Bradie James’ Foundation 56 and Denton Regional Hospital.

Labels: alejandro chaoul, cancer patients, dr. richard t. lee, integrative medicine, lorenzo cohen, mbsr, md anderson yoga, secondary lymphedema, yoga for cancer, yoga research


Greetings from India, Part II
By Pamela Ryan
Thursday, July 12, 2012

[Susan here. I'll be relaying Pam's trip to India in the next few posts through her emails to me. Looks like an amazing adventure!]
Courtyard at the ashram
Here is what I've learned from the Ayurvedic specialist, Dr. Vishnu, at the ashram.

1) Ayurveda relies on evaluating the individual's constitution or dosha by a study of physical and psychological tendencies. It's a bit complicated but an interesting way to look at ourselves.
[Pam's side-note: If you are interested, read Deepok Chopra's Perfect Health for details.]
2) Focusing on the specific treatment modalities, the nutritional recommendations seem in line with what we know in the west.
3) The herbal remedies are intended to strengthen the immune system and from my understanding are not used as a cure or treatment, especially for serious illnesses such as cancer. In such cases, traditional allopathic care is merely supplemented with ayurvedic intervention.
4) There are two main treatment modalities for acute illness that are in current use:

Panchakarma and Laya yoga. Panchakarma is a 5-step process of purification that involves some pretty rough stuff: induced vomiting, enema series, nasal cleanses and oil massages. [Google Panchakarma for details and referrals :)]

Laya yoga is very interesting, and actually is being promoted in the West by Lance Armstrong's LiveStrong foundation. It is a specific meditation that is best described as sensory focused. It's simple to describe but takes a long time to master. [You can bet Susan will learn more about that at the MD Anderson symposium later this month.]
The bottom line I think: see your doctor regularly and be proactive. Research all that's available to you -- allopathic, naturopathic, traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and Ayurveda.




Dining Hall

Pamela's roommate


Satsang




Satsang with Shanti, the ashram pup

***Pamela Ryan is a yoga teacher and co-founder of Yoga Bridge™.  Yoga Bridge™ addresses the needs of people in any stage of cancer diagnosis/ recovery through the healing practice of yoga in a supportive and nurturing environment. This program is provided through the generosity of Bradie James’ Foundation 56 and Denton Regional Hospital.


The Unassuming Beauty of Yoga
By guest writer, Billie Jo Neubauer
Monday, July 9, 2012

 “…and suddenly, my whole world changed…”

A group of cancer survivors meets each week in a conference room to practice yoga.

Amidst A/V equipment, podiums, chairs and uh, work stuff ~ some very dedicated yogis carve out some space & time for their practice. New yogis. Injured yogis. Yogis dealing with the after-effects of chemo - the hearing loss, the weakened bones, the scar tissue from reconstructive surgery.

However, when I arrive to co-teach the class, a conference room is not what I encounter. I am entering a private sanctuary of unassuming beauty. Have you ever seen a halo? Really seen one? I think I have. To see a woman with one breast relaxing into savasana is to see God.

All the puzzle pieces click for me. Yoga doesn’t save us from tears or protect us with any superpowers. As far as I know, grief-proof vests aren’t included with a mat purchase. But just like the lotus flower, I know the sun shines above me. I know we all have our roots in the muck somewhere.

I know beauty comes from the most unexpected places. In this humble yoga room, there is no pity. And there sure as @#!*% aren’t any excuses. There is, however, a lot of laughter and love and beauty.

My life will forever be changed. My teaching has changed in a deeply spiritual & unexplainable way. I sincerely thank God for that. As a yoga teacher, I am reminded: these are precious lives that I hold in my hands.

***Billie Jo Neubauer is an E-RYT Yoga Teacher and massage therapist in Flower Mound. www.ReneuUYoga.com She was a guest teacher in the Yoga for Cancer Class at Denton Regional in June.

Labels: bj neubauer, Breast cancer yoga, Cancer Survivors, denton county yoga cancer, lotus and yoga, renueuyoga, susan reeves yoga, Yoga Bridge


Greetings from India
By Pamela Ryan
Thursday, June 28, 2012

[Susan here. I'll be relaying Pam's trip to India in the next few posts through her emails to me. Looks like an amazing adventure!]

Diary Entry One:

Happy Saturday morning! It's 7:30pm here, and we are having some fruit and settling down from the day. I've mostly been resting, reading and visiting with Dr. Thampi [university professor of yoga philosphy] who has been so amazing. Next week we visit the Ayurvedic hospital and meet with an oncology massage specialist. In the meantime I have a reading list the length of my arm! Had an unbelievable 90 minute foot massage: meaning the therapist massaged me with her feet! Can't wait to share the details on that one....Seriously, I'm working here!
Escort to massage/facial at Manaltheeram

My first impressions: I am amazed by the radical humility practiced by my teachers. Both Dr. Thampi and Arathy [Pam's yoga teacher there] seemed puzzled when asked to take their photos. They do not self promote at all and do not compete. They are modest in every sense and that is matched by their compassion.
Arathy, Pam's teacher

Diary Entry Two
Arabian sea: view from cafe at Manaltheeram
When my head finally cleared from the 29-hr trip, I realized three days had passed. But I was in good hands! Sanu the Saint does 4am airport pickup, Sudheesh's house is...wow, Dr. Thampi is an icon: world-renowned philosopher, historian and authority on yoga and is available for discussion anytime.




Tulsi has cooked for the Thampis over 30 years and turns out made from scratch, knock your socks off Indian dishes. And Manaltheeram Auyervedic Retreat is 40 minutes away.
The real stuff starts this week: Checking into Sivananda ashram tomorrow for 3 days, and meeting with oncology massage therapist and Auyervedic doctors at hospital planned. Will touch base next week and update further.
Til next time,
Pam

Diary Entry Three
Finally got power back. Rolling blackouts are common here. Dr. T hesitates to make any strong statements about the delivery of health care since he is "just a layperson." He does believe an integrated approach is an intelligent approach, especially in the case of serious illness such as cancer. His position is that taking advantage of the miracles of technology can and should be supported with immune supporting Ayurvedic methods. Herbal applications and massages obviously will not cure cancer, but if they support the patient by relieving pain, anxiety and stress, which is a causal component in both illness and recovery, why not?
"The patient just wants to get better," says Thampi, "and preferably faster and at less cost." But the paradigm is that Ayurvedic medicine, while affordable, heals slowly, as generally the focus is on building a healthy immunity; on the other hand, technology heals fast and is quite costly.

Running out for chai!

P.

Miss u too!!

Diary Entry Four

This man [Dr. Thampi] is so humble. Had just finished great discussion on his views re: integrated medicine-allopathy, naturopathy and Ayurveda. Humility doesn't allow him to recite his wisdom for my recording!

The yoga/Ayurvedic connection is so ancient and deep that it's hard to concisely convey it. But the complimentary benefits of the integrated approach are too great to ignore, and evidence-based research is paving the way. I will send synopsis later. Off to yoga...


Diary Entry Five
Sivananda Ashram

New development here: decided to check in to Sivananda ashram for 2 weeks starting Sunday (7/1-15), and will be out of touch during that time. Cell phones are turned in at check in and returned at checkout. This thrills me to no end!! If Kerala is the Ayurveda center of India, then Sivananda Vendata Dhanwanteri Ashram is the epicenter according to my guides here. Will have to direct everyone to the website for pics.

I'm taking private lessons daily this week with Arathy at their location in downtown Trivandrum before heading to the mother ship Sunday. Wish you could hear Arathy's voice. She sings " inhaaaaaaaale and exhaaaaaaaaaale" and during savasana "relaaaaaaaax.." it is SO sweet! Wish you were here :)

P.

Diary Entry Six

http://www.sivananda.org/ndam/

Share the link I'm forwarding to you [above]. The Sivananda ashram has simplified the 8 limbs to 5 main points, and I think made the complicated philosophy incredibly understandable and accessible. My favorite sound bite yet: "However much we know or skillful we become, everything depends on the grace of the spiritual nature."

More to come,

Pam

BTW: texting, it turns out, isn't without fees :/
Namaste!
Pam:)

Pamela is a yoga instructor and co-founder of Yoga Bridge™. 

Labels: ayurveda and cancer, ayurvedic massage, kerala, manaltheeram, pam in india, pam ryan, pamela ryan, sivananda ashram, sivananda vedanta, yoga and ayurveda, Yoga Bridge

Yoga and Cancer - The Research
By Susan Reeves
Thursday, June 21, 2012

There has been much talk lately about the benefits of yoga on people undergoing treatment for cancer. Dr. Lorenzo Cohen, Ph.D., is someone who is at the forefront of actual research into this topic. Dr. Cohen is a professor of General Oncology at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, Texas. As stated in this article from the MD Anderson web-site, he is currently conducting "a number of NIH-funded randomized controlled clinical trials examining the biobehavioral effects of contemplative mind-body practices aimed at reducing the negative aspects of cancer treatment and improving quality of life". These include studies of meditation, Tibetan yoga, and Patanjali-based yoga. He is part of a ground-breaking phase III clinical trial of yoga for women with breast cancer.


So far, the results have been hopeful. From the US National Library of Medicine, this article reports positive results from the effects of yoga on quality of life in women with breast cancer undergoing radiotherapy. The patients were interviewed about their levels of fatigue, intrusive thoughts, sleep disturbances, depressive symptoms, and anxiety before radiotherapy and then again 1 week, 1 month, and 3 months after the end of the therapy. The results showed that the yoga program was associated with "statistically and clinically significant improvements in aspects of quality of life".

Next month I will be attending a training conference at MD Anderson that explores the effects of yoga and other complementary alternative treatments on people in cancer treatment. Dr. Cohen is one of the presenters. I have so many questions to ask him and the other leaders. I'm looking forward to this opportunity, and I can't wait to share what I learn with the students I teach at our Yoga for Breast Cancer Survivors class at Denton Regional.

***Susan is a co-founder of Yoga Bridge™. Yoga Bridge™ addresses the needs of people in any stage of cancer diagnosis/ recovery through the healing practice of yoga in a supportive and nurturing environment. This program is provided through the generosity of Bradie James’ Foundation 56 and Denton Regional Hospital.

The purpose of Yoga Bridge ™is to address the needs of people in any stage of cancer diagnosis/ recovery through the healing practice of yoga in a supportive and nurturing environment. Serving the areas of Dallas/Ft. Worth, Denton, Flower Mound, Lewisville, and Highland Village. Our goal is to offer FREE yoga to breast cancer patients and survivors.

Click here to sign up for our monthly newsletter. We'll share information about yoga, cancer research, classes, and upcoming trainings. Contact us at yogabridge@hotmail.com

Labels: alternative cancer treatments, clinical trials yoga and cancer, denton country yoga cancer, md anderson yoga, susan reeves yoga, yoga and breast cancer, yoga and cancer research, Yoga Bridge


Yoga and Massage Workshop Review
By Susan Reeves
Monday, May 28, 2012

The Yoga Bridge™ workshop on Yoga and Massage (Thai Yoga) on May 26th was a great success. Pamela and Susan welcomed several yoga teachers and teacher trainees to practice yoga and learn some new massage techniques. For a full review, click here.

This is part of a new series being offered by Yoga Bridge™, called Feel Good Twice Workshops. Participants gain knowledge while at the same time supporting Bradie James' Foundation 56, an organization that provides services to women with breast cancer.

***Susan is a co-founder of Yoga Bridge™. Yoga Bridge™ addresses the needs of people in any stage of cancer diagnosis/ recovery through the healing practice of yoga in a supportive and nurturing environment. This program is provided through the generosity of Bradie James’ Foundation 56 and Denton Regional Hospital.

Labels: Bradie James, denton, denton regional medical center, pamela ryan, prana flow, susan reeves, teacher training, thai massage, thai yoga, Yoga Bridge


Preparing for the Yoga and Massage Workshop
By Susan Reeves
Thursday, May 3, 2012

Pamela and I (Susan) stayed after class the other day to prepare for an upcoming workshop on Yoga and Massage (Thai Yoga) on May 26th. It was a tough job, but I willingly volunteered to be her assistant. These are a few of the photos that will be going into the manual, included in the workshop.


This is part of a new series being offered by Yoga Bridge™, called Feel Good Twice Workshops. Participants gain knowledge while at the same time supporting Bradie James' Foundation 56, an organization that provides services to women with breast cancer.

Participants will leave this workshop knowing how to release sinus pressure, neck and shoulder muscles, and pressure point releases for the hands and arms. A Gentle Flow Yoga class is also included.

Workshop is open to all  levels. Sign up now to reserve your spot.

The purpose of Yoga Bridge™ is to address the needs of people in any stage of cancer diagnosis/ recovery through the healing practice of yoga in a supportive and nurturing environment. Serving the areas of Dallas/Ft. Worth, Denton, Flower Mound, Lewisville, and Highland Village. Our goal is to offer FREE yoga to breast cancer patients and survivors.

***Susan is a co-founder of Yoga Bridge™. Yoga Bridge™ addresses the needs of people in any stage of cancer diagnosis/ recovery through the healing practice of yoga in a supportive and nurturing environment. This program is provided through the generosity of Bradie James’ Foundation 56 and Denton Regional Hospital.

Click here to sign up for our monthly newsletter. We'll share information about yoga, cancer research, classes, and upcoming trainings. Contact us at yogabridge@hotmail.com

Labels: Bradie James, Breast cancer yoga, Foundation 56, gentle yoga, massage workshops, thai yoga, yoga, Yoga Bridge, yoga workshops


Relay for Life
By Susan Reeves
Sunday, April 22, 2012

Yoga Bridge™ visits Denton Relay for Life on a beautiful Saturday afternoon at UNT's Fouts Field. We met lots of great people and got a chance to tell them about our Free Yoga Classes for Breast Cancer Survivors. We enjoyed sitting with our friends at the Denton Regional Medical Center tent. Pamela gave massages for donations to Relay for Life while Susan set up weary marathoners in comfy restorative yoga poses.
The Survivor Lap
Pamela massages tired shoulders.

















Judy J. with mom-in-law, both survivors

Ahh, the restorative yoga mat awaits.


The group at Denton Regional raised $9,037.

The purpose of Yoga Bridge™ is to address the needs of people in any stage of cancer diagnosis/ recovery through the healing practice of yoga in a supportive and nurturing environment. Serving the areas of Dallas/Ft. Worth, Denton, Flower Mound, Lewisville, and Highland Village.

***Susan is a co-founder of Yoga Bridge™. Yoga Bridge™ is a 501(c)(3) non-profit that addresses the needs of people in any stage of cancer diagnosis/ recovery through the healing practice of yoga in a supportive and nurturing environment. This program is provided through the generosity of Bradie James’ Foundation 56 and Denton Regional Hospital.

Labels: Bradie James, Breast cancer yoga, Cancer Survivors, Cancer walk, Denton Regional, Denton Relay, Foundation 56, Relay for Life, Yoga Bridge

3 comments:

  1. nice post
    Yoga is the natural way to stay happy, healthy and stress free. It is the best home exercises you can do around the house.
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  2. Nicely explained . Yoga is really helpful to cure many major diseases to all doctors say no.

    ReplyDelete

  3. Your blog keeps getting better and better! Your older articles are not as good as newer ones you have a lot more creativity and originality now keep it up!
    Yoga Instructor Course &Yoga Teacher Training

    ReplyDelete